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New Linux Computer Build In The Works

I use a Windows computer in my day-to-day operations, but I’ve been using Linux on and off for many years. While I can’t switch completely to Linux, it’s time that I have a dedicated Linux workstation on my desk. Here is the hardware I’ve spec’d out for this build. It doesn’t need super mega high performance, or have ultimate graphics, so keep that in mind. My goal is a small footprint, and as inexpensive as possible while getting the most bang for my buck.

ComponentPart NameCost
CaseCooler Master Elite 130 Mini-ITX Tower$49.99
Power SupplyCorsair Semi-Modular ATX CX450M$59.99
MotherboardASRock - H170M-ITX/DL$84.99
CPUIntel Core i3-6100 BX80662I36100$115.94
RAMCorsair Vengeance LPX 16GB PC4-24000$69.99
StorageSamsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD$85.85
OSArch Linux$0.00
Total Cost$466.75

Overall this seems like a pretty solid hardware selection. I can’t wait to get started!

Setting a static IP Address on Ubuntu Server 14.04

This process uses the command line to set a static IP address on Ubuntu Server 14.04.

Note: If you do this process from an SSH session, you will lose connection when you enter the final command. But if you did everything correct, you simply need to establish a new session using the static IP address you assigned.

sudo nano /etc/network/interfaces

This is what the default file will look like:

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp

This similar to what should look like for a static IP. Of course, use addresses relevant to your network:

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
        address 10.5.1.33
        netmask 255.0.0.0
        gateway 10.5.1.254
	dns-nameservers 10.5.1.2 208.67.222.222 8.8.8.8

Lastly you need to reload networking:

sudo ifdown eth0 && sudo ifup eth0

Install Unifi Video (NVR) on Ubuntu 14.04

This is a new post with basically the same instructions only not tied to a specific version. I will keep this post edited to reflect the current version.

I’m starting with a fresh, fully updated server install of Ubuntu Server 14.04 64bit.

Download the current Unifi Video deb package. 3.4.0 as of this edit (9/25/16)

wget http://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/unifi-video/3.4.0/unifi-video_3.4.0~Ubuntu14.04_amd64.deb
sudo dpkg -i unifi-video_3.4.0~Ubuntu14.04_amd64.deb

At this point you will probably receive an error about missing dependencies. No worries, simply run the following.

sudo apt-get -f install

That command will install all the needed dependencies and finish installing the unifi video deb package. At this point, Unifi Video is installed and should be running. Open a web browser and point it to https://ipaddress:7443.

My VM server parts list

Here is the list of components that I have ordered for this VM server build.

You may notice that there are no drives as part of my order. I’m going to install the server OS on either a USB flash drive or a small SSD that I currently have. As for VM storage, I will do a test install using an HDD that I have laying around, but in the end I’m going to see if I can get it connected to storage on my Synology NAS, which has ~6TB of storage capacity.

My total cost so far for these parts is: $523.78

 

Building a virtualization server

Going to be changing up my network a bit and want to start by adding a VM host server. I want to migrate my domain controller over to Windows Server 2012 R2 and I want to add a few more Linux servers to the mix. Currently my only physical server is a whitebox build running Server 2012. Besides being my current domain controller, I’m also running Hyper-V on it with a few Linux guests. It’s not the ideal setup, so that’s why I’m moving to an actual proper VM server. I can then run my DC as its own VM, and the Linux servers as their own VM’s.

Parts have been ordered and some even starting to arrive. I will do another post shortly outlining the exact parts ordered and the host software I plan to use. As well as any issues I run in to  along the way.

Install Unifi Video 3.2.0 (NVR) on Ubuntu 14.04

I’m starting with a fresh, fully updated server install of Ubuntu Server 14.04 64bit.

Download the Unifi Video 3.2.0 deb package

wget http://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/unifi-video/3.2.0/unifi-video_3.2.0-Ubuntu14.04_amd64.deb

sudo dpkg -i unifi-video_3.2.0-Ubuntu14.04_amd64.deb

At this point you will probably receive an error about missing dependencies. No worries, simply run the following.

sudo apt-get -f install

That command will install all the needed dependencies and finish installing the unifi video deb package. At this point, Unifi Video is installed and should be running. Open a web browser and point it to https://ipaddress:7443.

Arch Linux Home Server Challenge…Accepted

On a recent episode of Linux Action Show, Chris talked about his new home server setup based on Arch Linux. As a long time Arch Linux user myself, the thought of a server based on Arch is a bit concerning, but the points Chris made about going with Arch are valid. Being that if you keep the Arch install simple and focused, chances of breakage are greatly reduced, and you get the benefit of a rolling release with modern and constantly updated¬† packages. But there is still that Arch risk of a broken system when a package fails or the developers decide to make a major system change and you update the system without keeping track of Arch news. Yes, that’s happened to me plenty of times with my desktop install.

I’ve decided to give this a try myself following Chris’s model, using virtualized installs of Arch that are focused on specific tasks. I will also use Proxmox as the host and Arch Linux as the guests. I’m not familiar at all with Proxmox, and currently don’t have any powerful computers for an apples to apples comparison. I also won’t be going with a separate FreeNAS storage solution for all the data. However, I do think this will still be a great learning experiment and kind of fun. If I’m really happy with the results, maybe I will invest in some better hardware.

Also, I will do my best to to document my setup and install notes on my wiki here: http://cdavis.us/wiki/index.php?title=Arch_Linux_Home_Server_Challenge

Linux Reality Podcast Complete Archive DVD Available

Linux Reality, one of the first and best podcasts for Linux users has ceased production as of episode 100. Chess has decided to end the series for personal reasons and everyone of the shows fans supports his decision. Chess has very recently announced the release of the complete 100 shows along with show notes on a single DVD. All for only $30.

What a great way to say thanks to Chess for everything he has done. Chess and his podcasts are now part of the Linux revolution and every new user should make his episodes part if their learning just like they may buy a book or take a class.

I’ve sent my email to order one.

To order, just send him an email: linuxreality@gmail.com
Full info: Link